Best Practices For Using the App Store

March 7th, 2014  |  By Allison Saffiotti

When releasing a new iPhone app to the App Store it’s no surprise there are millions of other apps to compete with. This is why creating as much visibility as possible is so important. It is key that potential users can find and easily download your app as opposed to others. The name, icon and description are what users take into account when deciding to download an app. This simple guide offers tips of best practices for the App Store.

 

Icon creation is the first to consider, as this is the first impression a user has of an app. It is a very important component of marketing, as this will appear on websites, press releases and other online forums. Basic rules to follow include having no words; instead having a simple design that is consistent with the app. Adding small details is encouraged as a way to stand out.  

 

After the icon, the first thing a user sees is the app name. It is important to state what the app does in the name. The words should act as keywords as this will assist when users are searching specifically for this app. Apple gives 99 characters for keywords so it is important to choose wisely.

 

As both the name and icon are primary factors of importance, the description is the final key part determining if users will purchase an app. This is where a developer convinces the user to download their app instead of others. The first three lines are the most important as they are directly visible and primarily what is read by users.



App store optimization is only useful if continuous updates are made to keep information as relevant as possible and maintain user need and interest. The app store is continuously changing so apps should reflect this.

 

If you are an app developer, continue to check PreApps for insider tips on how to make your app top selling!

Comments & Suggestions

Name (optional) Email (optional)

Comment must be under 500 characters


Can't read the image? click here to refresh sss
Enter the code here: